New report on child sexual abuse material – “The typical offender”

New report on child sexual abuse material – “The typical offender”
28 November, 2017 NetClean

New report on child sexual abuse material – “The typical offender”

Today, February 28, the third NetClean Report ­– a report about child sexual abuse material and child sexual abuse – is published. The focus this year is on the offender, and whether it can be said that there are traits and behaviours that are typical of offenders who view child sexual abuse material.

The report highlights that there is no stereotype and that the only known factor is that the offender is most often a man. The report also highlights that people who search for online child sexual abuse material do this 24-hours a day, seven days a week.

— There is a common belief in a stereotype that we have to let go of. Instead, we need to realise that the perpetrator can be someone who is well adjusted and has a successful This report highlights that offenders exist within all professions, can be of any age, and as often as not be in a committed relationship. With this in mind, if we concentrate on a perceived stereotype then our efforts to stop save children from harm will not be successful, says Anna Borgstrom, Head of NetClean.

The report also looks at how the offender who commits hands-on abuse gets in contact with children. The results showed that the most common scenario is that the perpetrator abuses their own children or the children of their partner. The next most common scenario is that the offender finds his victim in the extended family, and the third most common way is through the Internet.

— These results confirm already established research that states that most sexual assaults on children are committed by someone very close to them, highlighting that this is where we need to invest resources to tackle this problem. We also need to focus on the new trend of perpetrators finding their victims online, says Anna Borgstrom.

Some results from the report:

  • There is no such thing as a typical person who watches child sexual abuse material. The only thing that we can assume is that it is a man. The offender can be of any age, as often as not live in a committed relationship, has often got access to children through the immediate family or relatives, and can hold down any type of profession in all sectors.
  • People search for child sexual abuse material on the Internet 24 hours a day, every day of the week.
  • 30 percent of the police officers surveyed said that there is a correlation between viewing child sexual abuse material and committing hands-on abuse.
  • 5 percent of the police officers surveyed said that offenders who commit hands-on abuse victimise children in their own family. 65 percent said that own of the most common ways is to abuse children in the extended family / relatives. They stated that the third most common way is through the Internet (51.3%).
  • Trends: The use of chatrooms, apps, anonymisation technologies, encryption and cloud based services is increasing.
  • In 2016 the police officers surveyed collectively saved 3,100 children.

The research is unique of its kind – 435 police officers from 33 countries, who work exclusively on cases pertaining to child sexual abuse material, answered questions designed to capture their experience and expertise derived from working on these cases. The results have been commented on by several experts working in the field. For more information see the attached summary of the report, and the full report to read in-depth analysis and commentary from amongst others police, a psychologist, and NGOs.

For more information contact:

Anna Creutz — Communication Manager, NetClean
0046 (0)0703 08 10 77
anna.creutz@netclean.com